Tag Archives: Paris

Art market news: Serge Lifar’s estate sold for 7.3 million

iamageBuyers were on a high at the Geneva sale of dancer Serge Lifar’s estate.

Buyers were on a high at the Geneva sale last week of dancer Serge Lifar’s estate. The sale was estimated to fetch 1.5 million Swiss Francs (£1 million), but realised 7.3 million SFr. Top lot was a set of 48 drawings by Jean Cocteau for his book Opium, which sold for 912,000 SFr – nearly 10 times the estimate – to Paris book dealer Jean-Claude Vrain. The Musée des lettres et manuscrits de Paris was extremely active, spending nearly 1 million SFr on autographed manuscripts and drawings by Cocteau and his friend Raymond Radiguet. One of the most extraordinary results was the 430,000 SFr paid for two inscribed photographs of Lifar with Coco Chanel, and a letter from Chanel. The estimate was 300 SFr.

When Guernica Came to Town

imageIn 1938, one of Picasso’s most famous paintings was rolled up and taken to places previously untouched by art – even car showrooms

Every day, 11,000 people make the trip to the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid to see Picasso’s Guernica. The invisible infra-red wire around the painting is hyper-vigilant — the tiniest of leans (and I speak from experience) has alarms ringing, and guards to their feet, within seconds. Understandable, but a pity since all but the most eagle-eyed will miss the clues to an extraordinary story.

Over its 75-year history, it has been rolled and unrolled, stretched, nailed up, pulled down, driven, shipped and flown, all in the service of a cause. Creases and cracks mark its surface; its four corners are littered with puncture marks tracing the life it’s led.

booking.com international RS


Portrait believed to be of author Emily Bronte will be auctioned.

A hitherto unknown portrait believed to be of author Emily Bronte is expected to fetch thousands of pounds when it goes under the hammer this week.

The oil painting is the latest in a flurry of items relating to the Bronte sisters to be put up for auction in the last few months.

Its sale by JP Humbert’s in Northamptonshire comes after the auction house sold another painting of the reclusive writer for £23,836 in December.

Emily Brontë portrait goes under the hammer

imagePortrait believed to be of author Emily Bronte will be auctioned.

A hitherto unknown portrait believed to be of author Emily Bronte is expected to fetch thousands of pounds when it goes under the hammer this week.

The oil painting is the latest in a flurry of items relating to the Bronte sisters to be put up for auction in the last few months.

Its sale by JP Humbert’s in Northamptonshire comes after the auction house sold another painting of the reclusive writer for £23,836 in December.

Bruce Springsteen: I enjoy artists who take on the world

imageBruce Springsteen’s 17th studio album is his most overtly political yet. At its launch in Paris, the blue-collar icon reveals why .

“You can never go wrong in rock’n’roll when you’re p—ed off,” according to Bruce Springsteen. In Paris yesterday to unveil his new album, Wrecking Ball, to the world’s media, Springsteen admitted it had been written in a spirit of political anger. “My work has always been about judging the distance between American reality and the American Dream.”

Picasso and Modern British Art, Tate Britain, review

imageRichard Dorment wavers between exultance and despair at the Tate Britain’s exhibition about Picasso’s influence on British art.

When Tate Britain announced plans for an exhibition about Picasso’s influence on British artists such as Duncan Grant and Graham Sutherland, my snorts of disbelief could be heard in Sidcup. Recent exhibitions have pitted him against Titian, Rembrandt, Velázquez, Goya, Delacroix, and Matisse. To hang important works by him in a show full of his British imitators would be an act of cruelty.

Tour Auto: seeing France the fast way

imageAs one of the greatest classic car events around, the Tour Auto combines action, adrenalin, stunning scenery and sumptuous lunches.

The annual Tour Auto is the most extraordinary classic car event many of you will have never heard of. Held in France for the last 20 years, it’s a loving recreation of the Tour de France Automobile, which was first run in 1899 and took competitors on a gruelling route around the country’s nascent road network in examples of the very earliest “horseless carriages”.

Marseille in France

imageSituated on the south coast of France, Marseille is the second largest city after Paris and is one of France’s major tourist’s destinations. With plenty of things to do and places to see, you will never get bored of this sunny city. With oceanic views over the Mediterranean ocean, plenty of picturesque architecture and famous eateries there is something to for everyone. With the Mediterranean Ocean on its doorstep, Marseille enjoys warm weather with temperatures ranging from 21 to 30 degrees during the summer months. There is nothing better than to relax in a coffee shop or bar, drinking a beer overlooking Vieux Port- the old port of Marseille – with the sun warming your cockles whilst admiring the range of small boats and yachts in the port.

Frank Stella interview: the bigger picture

imageFrank Stella has been at the forefront of abstract art for half a century. Ahead of an extensive retrospective in Britain, he talks about his work

If you are looking for clues to the character of Frank Stella, the Formula One racing car parked inside his vast studio in upstate New York is a giveaway. ‘Ferrari gave that to me,’ the American abstract artist tells me nonchalantly, hooking a Cuban cigar from an ashtray beside him. ‘It did race, but it doesn’t have a motor now, so it’s just for show.’

Stella has been probing the limits of painting for more than five decades. His love of fast cars, though, dates from the mid-1970s, when BMW gave him one in exchange for decorating a racing model that competed at Le Mans. Six years later, in 1982, he was arrested for hurtling at 105mph along a highway in New York State. But the supercar inside his studio in Rock Tavern is testament not only to the artist’s love of speed. Once driven by Michael Schumacher, it also represents the competitive streak that has blazed through Stella’s life.

Take tennis. When he was younger – before, he says, his hip and knees ‘gave way’ – he used to play for hours, several times a week. After a while, though, his friends stopped playing with him. The gallery director Lawrence Rubin, who gave Stella his second solo show, in Paris in 1961, once said, ‘He doesn’t play for the fun of playing. He plays to win. And that’s the way he plays art.’

Ford Madox Brown, Manchester Art Gallery, review

imageA new show captures the brilliance of Ford Madox Brown, says Richard Dorment

Ford Madox Brown is the odd man out among the Pre-Raphaelites. Born in 1821 to English parents in Calais, he learnt to paint in the academies at Antwerp, Ghent and Paris. But from the beginning Brown was a paid-up member of the awkward squad. He rejected the academic systems and conventions he’d been taught at these institutions in favour of the archaic purity of line he found in the work of the German Nazarene painters, and although he shared the ideals of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, he never felt the need to became a member.

Peugeot 3008 Hybrid4 review

imageThe world’s first-ever diesel/electric hybrid passenger car, the Peugeot 3008 Hybrid4, goes on sale this autumn. Is it worth the wait?

Former General Motors boss Fritz Henderson described making petrol hybrid cars as “expensive squared. But making diesel hybrids,” he added, “now that’s expensive cubed.”

So welcome to the world’s first diesel/electric hybrid car, an expensively cubist creation from Peugeot-Citroën. First shown in Paris last year, this new driveline goes on sale in the 3008 SUV in November and in the following five months will appear in the 508 range and the RXH, an upmarket all-road estate. Yet even as it was being launched, rivals were muttering darkly that the Peugeot would be noisy and smelly.

Degas and the Ballet, review

image

Degas and the Ballet: Picturing Movement, Royal Academy of Arts, review
As this brilliant exhibition shows, Degas perfectly captured the whirling yet transient energy of dance, writes Alastair Sooke n February 1874, the French writer Edmond de Goncourt visited “a strange painter called Degas” in his studio. It proved a memorable occasion. Degas performed a kind of jig — a “choreographic sequence”, as Goncourt put it in his journal, based on the movements of ballerinas. The whole incident was “very amusing”, as Goncourt watched Degas “high on his points, his arms rounded, mixing the aesthetics of a dance master with those of a painter”.

Degas: the ascetic with an eye for the ladies

Degas had a unique genius for capturing the female form in motion. On the ever of a major new exhibition, Mark Hudson looks at the most enigmatic of the Impressionists.

image

Beyond the opulent facade of the Paris Opera, and the marbled entrance halls and salons, there is a warren of bleak corridors connecting the offices, rehearsal rooms and costume-makers’ workshops.

In the centre of this area, right behind the stage itself, lies a gilded chamber quite as splendid as anything in the theatre’s public areas: the so-called Foyer de la Danse. It was here, in the 19th century, that the abonnés, rich and powerful men whose status as “subscribers” gave them access to every area of the theatre, would come after performances to meet the dancers and proposition them.

The best travel apps

A good smartphone app can be a traveller’s best friend. Francisca Kellett looks at some of the best travel apps on the market.

image

Smartphones have been to the Noughties what the internet was to the Nineties – nothing short of revolutionary. If you don’t already have one, you soon will. And with a smartphone comes its innovative add-ons – apps, or applications.

Ten billion apps have been downloaded in the past three years. There are 17,000 travel apps on the market, and 160 million app-compatible devices are owned worldwide – iPhones, Androids, BlackBerrys and tablet devices such as the iPad.

Georgia: Blessed in a big-hearted country

Lisa Grainger gets a surprising welcome in a former Soviet republic that may be economically poor but has many other riches.

image

Within five minutes of arrival I knew Georgia was unlike any other place I had visited. On the London-Tbilisi flight, there had been only a handful of passengers, and one I had been watching with particular interest.

A dead ringer for Rasputin – tall, dressed in black and exotically handsome, with a grey bushy beard and hair bundled into a bun – he had bounded up to the plane door as soon as the wheels touched down, a little Harrods bag clutched aloft, like a Wise Man arriving to give Jesus gold.

We need a Toulouse-Lautrec to record our sleazy, hedonistic times

You may not have heard of Jane Avril, but you’ve probably seen her. A dancer at the Moulin Rouge, she was Toulouse-Lautrec’s favourite model; her orange-red hair and long, gangly legs pop up all over the place in his posters and paintings.

image

There she is, dancing the can-can at the Jardin de Paris, in the audience at the Divan Japonais (pictured) – two other Paris nightclubs – or knocking back absinthe at the Moulin Rouge.

All these pictures and posters have been brought together at a revealing exhibition, which has just opened at the Courtauld Gallery on the Strand (until September 18). Toulouse-Lautrec has been much loved in Britain since his first show here in 1894 – his posters still adorn a million student bedrooms and high street bistro walls – but there hasn’t been a show of his pictures in London for 20 years.

Government Art Collection, Whitechapel Gallery, review

A new exhibition gives the public a rare insight into the work – and works – of the Government Art Collection, says Richard Dorment.

image

In his best-seller Blink, Malcolm Gladwell made the point that human beings make up their minds about people, places and situations based on first impressions – and that these split-second judgments usually turn out to be right. The Government Art Collection (GAC) exists to create those first impressions. Established in 1935, its purpose is to ensure that the art on the walls of buildings the British government owns both at home and abroad is of the highest quality. Art tells the world who we are and the values we share – and anyone who doubts it should visit a foreign embassy or consulate where otherwise bare walls are adorned with the country’s national flag or a photograph of its supreme leader.

Nice, France: a cultural city guide

imagePaul Wade offers an essential cultural guide to Nice, a magical city on the French Riviera whose appeal lies in its reality.
When it comes to culture in France, only Paris boasts more museums and galleries; and, in Nice, all but one of the 20 are free. Topping the bill is the Musée Matisse. Rather than a collection of greatest hits, this follows the artist’s development, from his first dull oil of 1890 to the dramatic sketches for a chapel some 60 years later.

Georgia: Blessed in a big-hearted country

imageLisa Grainger gets a surprising welcome in a former Soviet republic that may be economically poor but has many other riches.

Within five minutes of arrival I knew Georgia was unlike any other place I had visited. On the London-Tbilisi flight, there had been only a handful of passengers, and one I had been watching with particular interest.

A dead ringer for Rasputin – tall, dressed in black and exotically handsome, with a grey bushy beard and hair bundled into a bun – he had bounded up to the plane door as soon as the wheels touched down, a little Harrods bag clutched aloft, like a Wise Man arriving to give Jesus gold.

Cruising on Seabourn Odyssey

image
Graham Boynton thought cruising wasn’t for him. That was until he took a trip with his family on Seabourn Odyssey from Istanbul to Athens.

There are some things in life that one should avoid confessing to when in serious company. For example, in the mid-Seventies it was social suicide to admit liking Abba’s music, as it is today with Sir Cliff Richard’s canon; equally, to claim a secret fondness for the novels of Barbara Cartland or the paintings of Vladimir Tretchikoff remains cultural death.

The 40-something ski bum: Why heavy ski gear needn’t be a burden

Is there any easy way to carry bulky luggage to the Alps? James Bedding offers tips on travelling to Switzerland with skis, snowboards – and other outsize items.

image

Given the trouble Laurel and Hardy had carrying a piano in ‘The Music Box’ (see footage here), you might think twice about attempting to bring one across Europe and up a vertical mile to a ski resort. Perhaps travelling with a traditional upright piano – an instrument that in Stan and Ollie’s hands turned into a weapon of mass destruction – would be ambitious. But what about carrying a modern digital piano?

It can be done, as I found out recently. Heaving the piano onto the luggage rack of Eurostar may have been a challenge, but wheeling it through the streets of Paris was a breeze, and gliding on the TGV through France and on Swiss trains surprisingly hassle-free.

Business traveller’s diary

When burnout hits, even the most robust business traveller needs an emergency pitstop. Frequent flyer Max Levene shares tips on his favourite city for beating the blues, Chicago

image

There comes a moment in every frequent traveller’s year when tiredness, introspection and self-doubt sneak through one’s usually powerful armour.
Your humble diarist hit the tiredness wall at the end of last week.

The sun may have been shining outside the office, but inside I was suffering from a cold shiver. Could I cope with yet another trip to Heathrow the next day? Did I have the heart to produce yet another thought-filled PowerPoint presentation? Could I muster any excitement for yet another lonely hotel room (however beautiful the décor)? And was I in any fit mental state for yet another corporate dinner?

Bernardo Bertolucci: ‘I thought my film-making was over’

600full-bernardo-bertolucci
‘For the last two or three years, I’d been thinking I wouldn’t be able to do any more movies,’ says Bernardo Bertolucci Photo: AGF s.r.l. / Rex Features
By David Gritten 5:00PM BST 14 Apr 2011

He is 71 now, and has received more than his share of critical and public praise since he shot his first film, The Grim Reaper, half a century ago. But the rush to honour the great Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci is currently more urgent than ever before.

Gearbest TS - BT35A08 Bluetooth 3.0 Car Audio Music Receiver with Handsfree Function Mic
TS - BT35A08 Bluetooth 3.0 Car Audio Music Receiver with Handsfree Function Mic only $2.99